Frequently Asked Questions

We have many distributors throughout the United States. To find a supplier in your area please contact the Wincore® customer service team at 1.866.WINCORE.

Please call 1.866.WINCORE and ask for the sales department.

An R-value is the measure of resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the resistance. U-value is the amount of heat transferred through a material. The lower the U-value, the slower the rate of heat flow and the better the insulating quality. The R-value can be obtained by dividing 1 by the U-value.

Condensation is caused by excess humidity in the home and appears on the coldest area of a wall. That is why condensation usually appears on windows.. The warmer the air, the more moisture it will retain, therefore when the air comes in contact with the colder glass, the air is cooled and moisture is released on the glass.

Use exhaust fans in your kitchen, laundry room, and bathroom. Vent gas burners and clothes dryers to the outside. Use a dehumidifier to remove excess humidity from the air in your home. Air out your home by opening your windows for at least a few minutes every day.

Yes, the vinyl can be painted. However, we definitely do not recommend it. The warranty on the vinyl becomes void if the vinyl is painted or stained, or if the surface is altered in any way.

Since vinyl does not pit, peel, or flake over time, simple care and cleaning can keep your windows looking beautiful for years to come. Heavy rains will keep the vinyl fairly clean, but you can also clean them yourself if desired. Do not use a high pressure spray to clean your vinyl windows. The pressure can damage the caulking and cause your windows to leak. Use a mild detergent and soft cloth or brush instead. For dirt and stains that are difficult to remove, please see the warranty (Replacement / New Construction).

NFRC is the National Fenestration Rating Council, a non-profit organization supported by the Department of Energy that helps consumers compare the energy performance of windows and doors. Window manufacturers that participate in the NRFC program are required to label every window with its thermal specifications. The consumer is then assured that those products meet the thermal requirements for energy efficiency set by the NFRC. Being a member of the NRFC is not required for window manufacturers due to the extensive third party inspection and product testing; however, Wincore® Windows and Doors is a participant of the NFRC program.

Energy Star® is a government program, administered by the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, that is designed to reduce the amount of fossil fuels used in heating and cooling through the energy efficiency of windows and doors. Windows and doors will only have the Energy Star® labels if they are tested by a third party laboratory through the NFRC program and meet predetermined U-value ratings. Wincore® windows meet Energy Star® performance guidelines.

Low E glass provides year-round energy savings. A thin, transparent metallic coating is applied to the glass and filters solar radiation. During the summer, Low E reduces heat gain and keeps your home cooler. In the winter, Low E keeps your home warmer by reflecting heat back into the home.

Argon offers a higher level of insulation. The Argon is located in the middle of the insulated glass unit. For air to insulate, it needs to be as still as possible because moving air carries energy. Argon is heavier than air, so it is less likely to experience convection or thermal movement.

The performance and lasting endurance of vinyl windows compares generously to other building materials. Vinyl offers low maintenance, energy efficiency, and lower cost while still creating an aesthetic appeal. Unlike other materials, however, vinyl does not shrink, swell, or bend during harsh weather conditions.

Wincore® Glossary

A

Accessory Groove
A shape included on a window or door frame that is designed for interior and exterior accessories to snap into.

Air Chambers
Small honeycomb spaces within the sash and frame that help to insulate and strengthen the window.

Air Infiltration
Uncontrolled air which passes between a window sash and frame.

Air Space
The sealed area between the panes of glass inside the insulating glass unit.

Annealed Glass
Raw glass that has not been treated, tempered or laminated.

ANSI
American National Standards Institute, a clearinghouse organization for all types of standards and product specifications.

Anti-Lift Block
Vinyl insert added to the head of a slider window, which prevents the sash from being removed while in the locked position.

Argon
A colorless, odorless, tasteless, non-toxic, non-flammable gas used to fill the air space between glass panes to improve energy efficiency.

ASTM
American Society for Testing and Materials, an organization that sets the standard for the testing of materials and methods of testing.

Awning Window
A window with its hinges on the top. The sash opens from the bottom and raises upward.

B

Balance
A mechanical device that provides force to the sash so they can be easily moved up and down and held in any desired position.

Balance Cover
A plastic piece used to cover the coil spring balance when inside the jamb.

Balance Shoe
A receptacle for the tilt pin to hold the sash and frame together that enables the sash to be tilted for cleaning and/or removal; attached to the bottom of the balance.

Bay Window
A combination of 3 windows—normally containing one large center unit and 2 smaller flanking units—that project from the wall of the home at a 30- or 45-degree angle.

Beveled Exterior
An angled extension from the frame of the window that gives the window an appealing exterior look.

Bottom Rail
The bottom horizontal profile of a sash.

Bow Window
A combination of 3–5 windows attached at 10-degree angles that project from the wall in an arc or circular appearance.

Brickmould
An exterior trim or casing that goes around the window to cover jambs and form a boundary between bricks or other siding materials.

Bronze Tint
Glass colored with a bronze appearance to help reduce the amount of light transmitted through the pane.

Butyl
A rubber material that seals the glass to the spacer system; used to create an airtight and water-tight insulated glass unit.

C

Cam Lock and Keeper
The components that pull the sash together when it is in the locked position.

Casement Window
A window with hinges on the side that allow the sash to open outward by turning a crank.

Casing
A decorative moulding used to cover the space between the wall and the edge of the window frame. Can be used both inside and outside.

Check Rail
See Meeting Rail.

Condensation
The process of moist air forming on the interior of a window, causing dew on the glass in warm weather.

Condensation Resistance Factor
The measurement of a window’s ability to reduce the potential for condensation.

Conduction
Heat transfer from one material to another through direct contact.

Contoured Exterior
An aesthetically pleasing sloped addition to the exterior of a window.

Convection
The heat transfer process caused by currents that flow from warm surfaces to cooler areas.

Custom Meeting Rail
A window in which the meeting rail is not centered in the window—either the top sash is larger or smaller than the bottom sash.

D

Dead Air Space
See Air Space.

Desiccant
A drying agent used between the panes of an insulated glass unit to absorb moisture. Prevents fogging between the panes.

Design Pressure
A numerical value that defines the structural wind load requirements for a building as well as the components of the building.

Double Glazing
The use of two panes of glass, separated by an air space, that helps increase energy efficiency.

Double Hung
A unit in which both the top and bottom sash move vertically, or up and down, in the window wall.

Double Strength Glass
A pane of glass with a thickness of 1/8”.

Drip Cap
A piece of molding attached to the top of a window during installation that helps to divert water beyond the outside of the frame.

Dual-Durometer
A material that generally has two or more levels of firmness.

E

Egress Code
A code determined by local building authorities that defines the minimum opening of a window for emergency exit or for firemen to enter.

ENERGY STAR®
An independent U.S. government program consisting of the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, product manufacturers, local utilities and retailers that establishes a set of guidelines to recognize the energy efficiency of everyday products.

Extension Jambs
A piece of wood or vinyl composite attached to the frame of a window used to increase the depth of the jambs to fit a given wall thickness.

Exterior Glazed
A unit that has the glass set to the outside of the house.

Extruded Frame
A screen frame that is shaped by forcing aluminum through a form or a die.

F

Fixed Unit
A window unit that does not operate or vent.

Fixed Panel
The non-operating sash of a patio door unit.

Frame
The perimeter of a window consisting of the head, sill and two side jambs.

Full Screen
A screen that covers the entire opening of a window unit.

Fusion Welded
The process of merging materials together using extreme heat until they are joined into one unit.

G

Gas Fill
A gas placed between glass panes in an insulated glass unit to decrease the U-factor.

Glazing
The process of sealing a piece of glass to a sash or frame.

Glazing Bead
A strip of vinyl applied to the perimeter of the glass to help hold it into place.

Glazing Tape
A double-sided tape used to form a weather-tight seal between the glass and the sash or window frame.

Grids
Decorative bars installed within the insulated glass unit that give the illusion that the glass is divided into smaller lites or a design pattern.

Grills
See Grids (above).

H

Half Screen
A screen that covers the opening of the operating part(s) of a window or door unit.

Head
The horizontal top section of a window unit.

Head Expander
A vinyl cap used on the head of the window as a filler to accommodate the gap between the unit and the rough opening.

Heat Gain
The transfer of heat from the outside of the home to the inside of the home.

Hinge
A moveable piece that enables a window to swing outward.

I

Insulated Glass Unit
Two or more pieces of glass separated by a spacer system, dehydrated and hermetically sealed at the edges to make one complete glass system with one or more air spaces in between.

Installation Holes
Factory-fabricated holes in the frame of the window or door for the purpose of installing a window or door unit.

Intercept® Spacer System
A unique, one-piece, tin-plated U-channel design that creates an effective thermal barrier to reduce conducted heat loss through the window. The U-channel design makes it stronger and better at retaining insulating gas than many other conventional designs.

Interlock
A construction feature that enables the sash of a unit to lock into each other for a tighter seal.

Interior Glazed
A unit that has the glass set to the inside of the house.

J

J-Channel
An extension extruded on the outside of the frame that serves as a “pocket”, which helps when using siding applications.

Jamb
The vertical side sections of a window unit.

Jamb Depth
The distance from the inside of the frame to the outside of the frame.

K

Keeper
The piece of the sash locking system that connects with the lock to pull the sash tightly into a locked position.

Keeper Rail
The horizontal piece of a double hung sash on which the keeper is mounted.

Keeper Stile
The vertical piece of a sliding sash on which the keeper is mounted.

L

Laminate Glass
Two pieces of glass banded together with a plastic interlayer between them.

Lift Handle
A grip used for raising and lowering the sash that does not necessarily run the length of the sash.

Lift Rail
A grip used for raising and lowering the sash that generally runs the length of the sash.

Lock
The part of the sash locking system that works with the keeper to pull the sash tightly together. Prevents the sash from being opened.

Lock Rail
The horizontal piece of a double hung sash on which the lock is mounted.

Lock Stile
The vertical piece of a sliding sash on which the lock is mounted.

Low Emissivity Glass (Low E Glass)
Glass that has a transparent metallic oxide coating. It allows light in, yet reflects heat and UV rays out in the warm weather and keeps heat in during cold weather.

M

Mainframe
The head, sill and jambs all welded together to make up the perimeter of the window.

Meeting Rail
The horizontal sections of sash that come together when the window is closed.

Meeting Stile
The vertical sections of sash that come together when the window is closed.

Mesh
The fiberglass material used to make a screen.

Mulled Units
2 or more windows joined with a mullion to make one unit.

Mullion
A vertical or horizontal vinyl connector piece that joins 2 or more windows to make one opening.

Multi-Point Lock
A lock mechanism that engages a window sash to the frame in several locations with the use of just one operator.

Muntin
See Grids

N

Nailing Fin
Either an integral extension or attached extrusion attached to the frame of the window used to help secure the window to the opening.

NFRC
National Fenestration Rating Council, an organization that provides fair, accurate and unbiased energy performance ratings for window and door units.

O

Obscure Glass
A type of textured glass usually used for privacy, light diffusion or ornamental effect.

Operating Panel
The moveable sash in a door unit.

Operator
A mechanism with a metal arm and gear used for opening and closing units that project out.

P

Panel
A lite of glass installed in a sash frame within the mainframe of a door unit, which can be either operating or fixed.

Patio Door
A glass door with at least two panels that slide back and forth to open with adjustable rollers in a track.

Picture Window
A window unit that does not operate or open.

Pivot Bar
A metal shaft that attaches the sash to the balance, aligning the sash to the frame and allowing the sash to tilt inward for cleaning.

Pull Handle
A grip used for sliding the sash back and forth that does not necessarily run the length of the sash.

Pull Rail
A grip used for sliding the sash back and forth that generally runs the length of the sash.

Q

There are no terms for this letter available.
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R

Rail
The horizontal sections of a sash.

Rough Opening
The framed opening in a wall that the new window or door unit will be installed into.

R-value
The measurement of a window’s resistance to heat flow.

S

Sash
The portion of the window unit that contains the glass.

Sash Stop
A vinyl piece placed in the jamb that prevents the sash from being raised or lowered too far in the frame.

Screen
Fiberglass material that is enclosed in a metal framing and installed in an operating window, allowing the sash to be opened. Light and air can enter but insects are blocked.

Seal Bulb
A soft compression-type seal used for weatherstripping purposes.

Sill
The horizontal bottom section of a window.

Sill Extender
A vinyl piece used on the sill of the window as a filler to accommodate the gap between the unit and the rough opening.

Single Strength Glass
A pane of glass with a thickness of 3/32″.

Slider Window
A unit in which both the left and right sash move horizontally, or back and forth, in the window unit. Can be a 2-lite or a 3-lite (ends operate and the center fixed).

Sloped Sill
A window sill with a downward slope design that aids in allowing water to run away from the home.

Solar Heat Gain
Direct sunlight and absorbed heat that enters a building.

Spline
The flexible material used when making a screen that holds the screen cloth into the frame.

Stationary Sash
A non-operating member in a window or door unit.

Stile
The vertical sections of a sash.

T

Tape Glazing
A process in which a 2-sided sticky tape is used to adhere the glass to the sash or frame.

Tempered Glass
A type of heat-treated safety glass that, when broken, breaks into small, pebble pieces instead of large slivers.

Tilt Latch
A mechanism that engages the sash into the frame of the window but can disengage to allow the sash to tilt into the home.

Triple Glazing
The use of three panes of glass, separated by two air spaces, that helps increase energy efficiency.

U

U-Value
The measurement of heat transferred through a window.

United Inches
The value found by adding the total width in inches of a unit and the total height in inches of a unit.

V

Vent Latch
Mechanism on the interior of a keeper sash that, when extended, holds the sash partially open for ventilation.

Visible Light Transmittance
The amount of light that is transmitted through the glass.

W

Weatherstrip
Material used to form a weather-resistant seal between the sash or frame of a unit.

Weep Holes
Small holes fabricated in the window unit designed to allow water to escape to the exterior of the house instead of accumulating in the sill.

Wet Glazing
A process in which a silicone-based substance is used to adhere the glass to the sash or frame.

X

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Y

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Z

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